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Thursday, February 19, 2015

HOW TO WRITE - When the verb has two objects

When the verb has two objects


Many verbs can be followed by two objects – a direct object and an indirect object. Common verbs that can take two objects are: give, take, lent, buy, bring, fetch, get etc.
The indirect object usually refers to a person. The direct object usually refers to a thing.
Two patterns are possible.

1. Subject + verb + indirect object + direct object

This pattern is preferred when the indirect object is a pronoun or when it is shorter than the direct object.
Examples are given below.
  • I lent him (indirect object) my camera (direct object).
  • She brought me (indirect object) a cup of tea (direct object).
  • The teacher gave us (indirect object) some advice (direct object).
  • I have given him (indirect object) his money (direct object).
  • You must tell him (indirect object) the truth (direct object).
  • My father bought me (indirect object) a nice laptop (direct object).

Subject + verb + direct object + preposition + indirect object

Note that when the direct object comes before the indirect object, we have to use the preposition ‘to’ or ‘for’ between the direct object and the indirect object.
This pattern is preferred when the indirect object is longer than the direct object.
Examples are given below.
  • I lent my camera (direct object) to a friend of mine. (indirect object)
  • She made tea (direct object) for her guests (indirect object) .
  • The teacher gave some advice (direct object) to her students(indirect object).
  • I have given his money (direct object) to him (indirect object) .
  • You must tell the truth (direct object) to the police (indirect object) .
  • My father bought a nice laptop (direct object) for me (indirect object) .